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in the private sector outside law acknowledges is that if make areally going to difference in the new health paradigm, we have got to come to pyramid andf the recognize that is where the efficiencies are. putting greater emphasis on illness atd less on the top of the pyramid not only produces better results, but costs less money. it isn't that it has to be our goal is to cover the entire pyramid. putting the balance where it really needs to be with a far greater emphasis and reliance on care thanthe pyramid we ever had in history. that butbegins to do it is going to take a lot of additional effort. the eerie medical school is here before aboutalking the emphasis on internal and the need for more primary care. i was just delighted to hear they are one of the top schools in the country now in offering good primary care and internal medicine opportunities. i believe it is coming. it is a crass expression, but i think it is true, you have to follow the money. moneyve to follow the with regard to reimbursement, with regard to educational opportunities and where the is for assistance for stu
of the administration's decision to delay the employer mandate in health care law and various decisions on immigration and drug law. virginia republican bob goodlatte chairs the committee. we will have live coverage when they start. just a couple of news items on the industry should secretary of state, john kerry is in brussels. he's joining the diplomats around the world in hopes of persuading afghan manners to let troops remain in afghanistan beyond 2014, hamid karzai had signing the status of forces agreement. in washington, "the associated press" that the consumer finance watchdog is expanding its oversight of sallie mae and other companies. a rule issued today by the consumer financial protection bureau extends that agencies supervision to non-companies that have lenders. the cfp be overseas banks and service student loans, but most of the end from the white house, president obama will focus on the benefits of the health care law he will be flying by the white house says have benefited from the overhaul. he will remind american fork discrimination against those with preexisting conditions. we'll
, before i talk about the law and its benefits, let me tell you about a visit i made to the emergency room on a friday night recently with one of my boys after he broke his left arm. excellent.s so much of our emergency trauma and specialized care is. what was remarkable to me is not the care that my son got as grateful as i am, but rather the crying of two babies i heard in their emergency room being treated for asthma. dramatic asthma attacks. i cannot know for sure whether those babies were insured or not. if they did have coverage and the access to primary care that comes with such coverage, chances are it would have been far less likely to be getting emergency care for something like asthma on a friday night in the emergency room. parents broke full as -- my heart broke for those parents. they seek care for their suffering child in the emergency room. we are talking about asthma, something increasingly and sadly common, but also fundamentally treatable. dell with and the emergency room, which "the new york times" in great caret reminded us is the single most expe
pains to clarify the president's duty is to implement the law in good faith and to exercise reasonable care with the word take care in doing so. the fact is that scholars on both left and right can' concors broadly worded phase to handle with fidelity to all including indeed the constitution. as a legal and practical matter, the president's phase in of the employer mandate and other provisions as well with the job description so is the program for the childhood arrivals. i'm not going to go into that now but the congressman explained why that's true and in my written statement, we do so also. i have to say one quick word about what i know my good friend and frequent partner michael cannon is going to focus on, and that is his theory and he gets a lot of credit for picking it up and marketing it. his theory that the tax credits and subsidies must be available, that they are on the available to americans who have been living in states that have set up their own exchanges. i can't go into detail on this. in the questioning perhaps i will be able to do that, but if there is a few phrases i
follow constitutional law. in the federalist papers number government, what is itself but the greatest of all reflections on human nature? it went back to refer to the great security against gradual concentration of the civil powers in the same department consists in giving to those who would minister each department and the constitutional means and .otives to resist encroachment the government was set up to specifically prevent this. , i am seeings here, and not only in this administration, but in need radius of mistreating and several administrations, the executive branch is taking for granted that they have exclusive power over issues that they do not. i'm concerned about that and what we do to prevent that. where does this stop? this is my question. we have seen the president and the past presidents, concerning the war powers act, which, i think, have violated the constitution. in this administration, they detained illegal immigrants. they stopped enforcement of drug laws, i know that because i'm a prosecutor and i saw it. he stopped the enforcement of mandatory sentencing and part
new law, which is something that happens under all administrations, it has to happen sometimes for practical reasons. why we are making a big fuss about this as a constitutional matter, is not beyond me. i understand why it is being done. if it sounds like politics, that is what it is. position. >> i have too little time for two little questions. let me start by saying that i generally in many respects agree with professor turley about the growth of the presidency over the last half century or more. i am particularly concerned about the abuse of the war powers by many president and the state secrets doctrine for the enforcement of constitutional rights and a surveillance under bush and obama and the patriot act, warrantless surveillance in the bush administration and things like that. i must say that everything we are talking about today is laughable in my opinion in the context of these problems. i am particularly struck by the overwhelming hypocrisy of the claim that the president in interpreting the law and in refusing to interpret the law in the way that would drive a stake
of the health care law. this is an hour 45 minutes. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> good afternoon. i called this meeting to order. as we are all well aware the health care law requires businesses that employ 50 or more full-time or full-time equivalent employees to offer health insurance or pay an employer mandate penalty or a tax. a critical issue is the definition of employee but equally important is the issue of which and how many employees are it should be to to the business. the answer may be simple for one business with a single owner however when an individual shares ownership of multiple entities or when a business has multiple owners the answer is less clear. today we will examine the process of determining whether businesses are considered single or multiple entities under the health care law, which requires business owners to aggregate employees and could subject the business to the obamacare employer mandate. according to the national federation of independent business, 39% of small businesses with 20 or more employees on at least 10% of one or more other bus
to believe that the government is no longer constrained by the laws and they will conclude that neither are they. that is a very dangerous sort of thing where the president to do to wantonly ignore the laws, to try to impose obligation upon people that the legislature did not approve -. >> thank you, chairman. professor lazarus, made a statement about, at least i invert about this being political, i want to assure you that i left a lucrative law practice to come to congress in 2011 because i continually see the eroding of the constitution. is what protects us. so i'm not here for the pomp and circumstance, for the notoriety or to promote my career. i'm here because i'm concerned about the future of my children and the constitution to want to make that perfectly clear. number two, you may become it, and again, i invert that -- i inferred that the intent, intent wasn't an issue or was an issue in part of the affordable care act. and i don't want to get in to the details of that but i find that interesting that you made intent the issue when the speaker of the house at that time, nancy pel
of the court. live at seven eastern, "washington journal" examines implementation of the health care law. >> e-house education collegettee examines affordability and appel grant program. you can see it live at 10 a.m. eastern on c-span three. colombian president one man well santos speaks at the national press club about the economic and political situation in colombia. that is live also on c-span3. >> as you walk in, there tables out front with pamphlets, prior to entering the gun show. howpamphlets are all about the government is trying to take away your guns. those were the guys i wanted to talk to. they were the guys with the leaflets. i said to them. is this yourself? and they said yeah, who are you. i said i am an academic, a researcher and i'm doing research on these organizations and these ideas and trying to understand them. a bunch of them looked at me suspiciously and said -- and asked me questions. i said look, here's what i am. i don't get it. here's my job. i want to understand how you see the world. i want to understand your worldview. look, you will not convince me, and i will
. as a former dean, i know how important law school is and how generosity like yours can make -- can be. i'm very appreciative of what you have done for the university of alabama law school. i'm sure they tell you this all the time, but to hear from another dean, gifts like yours and support like yours make an enormous difference to a place like this. thank you. >> thank you very much. you certainly honored us with your presence. i enjoyed the conversation very much. >> will you join me in thanking justice kagan? [applause] >> thank you very much. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> on the next "washington journal," congressman tim huelskamp on the implantation of the health care law. then, conquer cars and -- then, congress men gregory meeks on the deal with iran. that is followed by scott patterson of "the wall street journal" on volcker rule. live every morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. as he walked in, there are tables with lots of pamphlets. the gun the pamphlets are how the gover
they passed the law and implemented it, the target of the young people were not signing on. and then later on they did enroll into the health affordable care act. so we believe that type of trend that we saw in massachusetts will be seen throughout the country. >> can i answer yours? okay. you know, so for my own personal situation, i'm in one of the rural areas with very high health insurance. and low -- lower income. our county has about 99,000 as a population with an average household income of middle 40,000s. as i struggle to provide more health insurance and they aggregate the businesses to make it -- you know, if i can stay under that 50, i will. it will be extremely expensive for me. in the meantime, to absorb a 40% to 44% health insurance increase, it would be much easier for me to put my employees out on the exchange. it's a lot cheaper for them to provide that than for me to absorb that additional cost within my small profit margins anyway. so thank you. >> i would just comment that if the additional cost of adding each employee would be approximately $4,000 to provide insurance
, there has been on the books a law which will expire at midnight tonight that has protected us from weapons going through detectors that are not made of metal that the detectors can't detect, and of course not only are we talking about government buildings and other secure facilities but clearly we're talking about airports as well. and so now computer technology has advanced to the point ever since we had that old law that you can actually with a computer, through a 3-d processing, laying down plastic layer upon plastic layer, you can create a weapon, a weapon that cannot be detected with most of the detectors that we have today. that old law needs to be updated, but apparently there are those who do not want it updated. and so as a last gasp, we are appealing to the senate before the stroke of midnight tonight, when this law is erased, to continue the old law that will at least go after the plastic type weapons, plastic guns of which their manufacturer is required that they have some part of metal in them in order to detect them. but the technology has surpassed that. they can now manufac
were just out there pimping ourselves and the law practice the blog would be very different and much less successful. how well it does or doesn't right now really turns on the fact that people don't perceive it as something that's out there trying to sell you something or to develop the some advantage for our law practice and i do think tony raises a really important set of issues that should be discussed and that is, okay, but can you truly have it both ways? can you practice in front of the supreme court, right, and your professional success there depends on your credibility with the justice and at the same time run an institution that is going to truly cover the supreme court? and truly be able to describe it warts and all? and how is it that you navigate that sort of thing if you want to really call yourself a journalistic institution? because that dilemma will repeat itself too potentially. if you're an expert in physickings, if you're an expert in plumbing there are lots of things you can talk about and write about and cover where you don't face the dilemma of really pissing so
for the first time when reference block when for the first time guarantees in law that gives the rules of the european change if there's more transfer from this european union. there will be a referendum. that is to position my party believes in. that is our guarantee referendum will take place when it is determined. i understand this part is having a debate which is now changing that position. my party, however, will stick to what we legislate for in the summer of 2011. >> my friend wanted to know whether the british tax paper values the money, yes or no? >> our judgment is yes, that easy as it might become easy but might be to make judgments about the value of the company, according to price in the market on any one day, we on this issue as on so many others are determined to take a long-term view, not score short political points. >> sir, peter bone. >> mr. speaker, hasn't the acting prime minister been outstanding today? i think you are listening on the radio you would have thought he was a right angle member for whitney. now, i think he's turning into a tory. can i test that theor
, taking care that the laws be faithfully execute, the core of that requirement is non-discriminatory enforcement. >> mr. lazarus, do you want to add any to this, perhaps not? mr. cannon, would you like to add any to this. >> i would like to ask, isn't the nuclear regulatory commission -- >> i'm going to reclaim my time, mr. lazarus. before i get to you, mr. cannon, i want to use my last minute with mr. rosencrans. you said that, in extreme instances impeachment would be appropriate to address, you know, one of these transgressions. we sues -- used example, declaring war without congressional authorization. on scale of one to 10, that being a 10 as necessitating impeachment proceedings, we've related off six instances where the president has exceeded his constitutional authority. i would add a 7th in there on the, what he is doing with our drug laws and manned tore minimums and insistence that prosecutors not charge all the relevant facts. out of any of these seven, where do, which ones rise to the beat of most egregious and would any of them trigger what you would thin
to exercise reasonable doubt. that's an error of law. it really depends on the convergence of both an inexperienced corps of new readers who don't have the freedom to exercise their judgment when it's necessary. if you were to sort of compartmentalized in the knowledge, it depends on how you run it. if they are allowed to exercise that qualitative deliberative thought process as we look at these claims in these compartmentalized thinners of excellence, then it would work. i don't think that's necessarily it. just give them the ability to make decisions in exercising good judgment and having rules dictated as a quality of review standard. >> thank you. first of all, i think the asset the fairness is time. if we set up lanes and their pressure to go real fast, it won't matter if they're the most knowledgeable people on the planet. secondly, you are taking the veterans claim away from his local representative. the american legion or others of his organizations representative in boise, idaho, is not going to have access to the file or to you with the raiders if the case goes to denver.
contentious, emotional law when it passed. and i think many of us who work closely with indigenous populations and different triable organizations have found we've gotten much better at communicating with each other about the process. part of the problem is that remains will be swept off and hidden behind closed doors and who knew what went on. we have more interaction with the elders, triable groups, bringing them in to see with a we're doing. i've actually worked in cases where they burn sage or insisted that blessings of those of us doing the analysis occur before and after. being an anthropologist, i'm totally cool with that. it's great. and again, communication. coming from working in human rights cases, as opposed to domestic cases. we tend to work at the medical examiners, you don't see the work we do kind of behind the scenes. when we're on the ground, in these human rights cases, reoften interacting closely with families and relatives. i think those of us that have done that are much more comfortable working with indigenous population and different cultural practices. i think we've dn
of the law. i know mr. lazarus does. i know that you and i and mr. lazarus would all agree that a president were trying to tax and borrow and spend them hundred billion dollars without authorization tha that may be impeachable. >> does anybody think that the actions of going into iraq without actual knowledge of weapons of mass destruction or anything else would have been an impeachable offense? esther lazarus, you seem to be nodding. >> this regard the nod. i was very upset about that whether it is an impeachable and the decision congress would have to make. mr. turley? >> the issue does come closest for both president obama and president bush created the reason i do not think that it rises to that level is because iof the court's decisions they have made this feel like such of a mass. first of all, by the judicial and then not reviewing it it's very hard to maintain the offense when you have that degree of ambiguity. i do not belief that ambiguity is in the constitution. i believe the president obama violated the constitution of libya, for example. but because of that history and preceden
cornell university and a law degree from cardozo school of law. she worked at a wall street law firm for several years. she taught history in brooklyn while serving as counsel for the president of the united federation of teachers. she served as president for 12 years before her election as aft president in 2008. that ends the biographical portion of the program. as always, we are on the record here. please no live blogging or tweeting or other means of filing well this is underway. there is no embargo on the breakfast. our friends at c-span have agreed not to air video of the session until one hour after the breakfast is over to give reporters time to file. give me a nonthreatening signal and i will call on one and all. low on the subtleties scale, but nonthreatening anyway. the nonthreatening is what i'm concerned about. we will offer our guest the opportunity to make some opening comments and then we will move to questions around the table. thank you for doing this. >> first of all i just want to say thank you for all of you for being here. and thank you for letting me engage in t
miranda under the terror laws, it's apparent from the witness statement that the government knew then or i would say they knew already that we discussed the use of names with a cabinet secretary when he visited us in mid-june. so it's been six months when it was apparent that have been names in these documents. i told the cabinet secretary personally we are sharing this material with "the new york times." on july 22 i did the editor of "the new york times" phone number, e-mail address and stephen engelbert from propublica. not once in six months -- >> you can guarantee and often a difficult you can guarantee you're telling this committee you can guarantee the security of all these names of these officers? >> your original question was the copy "the new york times" has to i believe that is being held securely, yes. >> all the copies to anything under your control. have you guaranteed that these names will not leak out? >> i can only talk about the copies under the joint control of "the guardian" and "the new york times" and i can say -- >> you can guarantee it? both the criticism -- >> i ju
sponsored the patrick leahy law and that prohibits the department of state and defense to provide military aid to foreign military and police forces that engage and violate human rights. and he never stops leading on an issue central to our mission at human rights first and that is refuge protection. and the act he sponsors elimina eliminates them from not having safe places to go. in 2009, he called for the creation of an independent investigation for torture after 9-11. he is a determined pragmatic person and an idealist who is less interested in making statements than change. he is willing and able to work with republicans on human rights and/or other -- and other issues -- he and rubio are trying to get the trafficking victims protection act. patrick leahy is now the longest serving u.s. senate and he is president pro-term of the senate. don't tell him that, because he thinks, and i think all of us in the room know it is true, that he is just getting started. ladies and gentlemen, i hope you will give a warm welcome to our keynote speaker, the honorable patrick leahy. [ applause ] >> t
. >> on the next washington journal, republican of kansas on healthlementation of the care law. then congressman gregory meeks, democrat of new york. with ks about the deal iran over the country's nuclear program. scott patterson on the volcker rule and how it implemented. live every morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> president obama's use of power related to the health care law. immigration policies and drug laws. coverage ofour live the hearing starting at 10:00 c-span 2.rn on are you walk in, there tables in front with lots of pamphlets, prior to entering the gun show. temperature pamphlet is how the take ment is trying to away the right to own guns, obama is doing that and obama is that and obama care is awful. talk to them. they said, who are you? i'm an academic, a researcher. research about these organizations and ideas. i study men who believe this stuff. and a bunch of them said -- they looked at me suspiciously and and i said, tions look here's what i am. don't get it. but here's my job. i want to understand how you see the world. i want to understand your world view. you will
of this law. [applause] it's the measurable outcomes in reduced bankruptcies and reduced hours that have been lost because somebody couldn't make it to work, and healthier kids with better performance in schools, and young entrepreneurs who have the freedom to go out there and try a new idea -- those are the things that will ultimately reduce a major source of inequality and help ensure more americans get the start that they need to succeed in the future. i have acknowledged more than once that we didn't roll out parts of this law as well as we should have. but the law is already working in major ways that benefit millions of americans right now, even as we've begun to slow the rise in health care costs, which is good for family budgets, good for federal and state budgets, and good for the budgets of businesses small and large. so this law is going to work. and for the sake of our economic security, it needs to work. [applause] and as people in states as different as california and kentucky sign up every single day for health insurance, signing up in droves, they're proving they want that eco
be restored? >> under current law, it will not happen. it needs to change. >> on me ask you this. i was not here in 1988, 19 89. i do not know if you were involved. >> i am old, yes. >> there was -- the democratic chairman put forward a catastrophic care program. he is very proud of it. and asked the congress might part -- by bipartisan vote. they went home satisfied with what they had done. and then something odd happened. people rejected the law that was passed. they rejected it because in a similar way it moved funding around in a way that seniors that would be deleterious to their well-being. do you remember what happened in spring after that? ,> after they got the bill after they chased them with the umbrellas the repealed the law. >> there is a mechanism by which this problem could be fixed also repeal.llow the 1989 >> there is no question this is physical -- fixable. it requires congress to act and congress to sign. to address the issue or ask. we have all these experts in front of us. cost ofeports that medicare has come down. we're going to get by the end of this week, the
on the implementation of the dodd-frank regulations law. >> from age eight betty ford knew she wanted to do something with -- she put on skits and plays and that led to bennington vermont where she studied at the school of dance. these are some of her notecards, her spiral notebooks where she kept notes. this is her organizer. hearing this period. she carried this with her to vermont, back to grand rapids, off to new york where she studied with martha graham and work for the powers modeling agency and then back to grand rapids again. and in it you will find a whole host of things that you would find just about any organizer. there are brochures on dance costumes. one of her sketches of the costume for one of the dance routines that she wanted to put on. here are again the choreography notes that she made for different dance routine so there's a whole wealth of material in here that talks about her love for dance and how deeply she was involved in it,, especially in her early years. wednesday at a house veterans affairs subcommittee looked at the backlog in processing veteran stability claims and deal
with carolyn and dan. >> what do you see in congress in terms of education laws, either major ones were smaller things? i wouldirst thing actually like to see in congress immigrationsive reform. i mean, if you look at what the senate did, there is a path there that a lot of people compromised on to create the path to citizenship plus ways of making sure that we take people out of the shadows, we grow our economy, and we make sure our borders are secure. foremost, thend house of representatives needs to focus on that. and i was part of the fast for families yesterday. having been arrested on the whole process of trying to get to immigration reform and whatnot. this is of education, an issue. showing an issue about whether the results actually really matter and what the research actually really matters, or whether the congress lives in an evidence-free zone. pre-k actually works to help level the playing field. the president has put a bill out there. the house of representatives actually have a bipartisan bill, that lies in the house of representatives and the senate, the miller-harkin bill that
that the work that the law center is doing, and i want to single out chris owens to say what melt has been doing to end that discrimination against people unemployed and unemployed for a long time. you don't have to add insult to injury for people. you don't have to tell them their's dogging it when they are trying to make their way. with that, i recognize congresswoman moore, congresswoman spear and we have congresswoman maloney. we've got to move fast. we don't know when votes are coming up. let's get all the questions in. >> thank you, madam co-chair. i know lisa and vera are frightened, but i find their testimonies very, very frightening and intimidating for the whole country. these people are master electricians, microbiologist, bachelor degree with a lot of executive experience and they are unemployed for a long time. what about those people who don't have their skillset? i'm sorry i missed so much of their testimony. i was perusing through their testimony. they say they've been looking for anything, part-time work, the extent to which they have been willing to accept jobs for half as much
on the health care law and website. this is 40 minutes. or satellite provider. now, >> and for a closer look at the ongoing efforts to get the health care site working. we go to a health care reporter and ms. ethridge let's start with the briefing on fixing the federal exchange website. what was your takeaway from that? >> the department official health and human services think they have hit the deadline for making the website work for most people by november 30th. they have done a management overhaul. it is up and running most of time up from 43%. the error rate is down to 1% and the wait time is seconds. >> and we read a bit of this from the wall street journal today. obamacare mission accomplished. was this a mission accomplish type briefing there? >> it wasn't a mission accomplish thing because they did a huge emphasis on we have a lot of work to do. this is by no-means a perfect system. we have it to where we want it. but there is going to be problems and things need to be fixed. this is an ongoing process to make it work better and better. and they acknowledge parts of the website need
justice. i asked the va to correctly promptly applied the law and grant my claims second comes seeking justice of our veteran. in the audience today is her son who lost his father asked for a when he was 12. also in attendance today is my niece, sandra peterson, who is the daughter of a vietnam war veteran, who also died from agent orange poisoning. mr. chairman, i filed my claim in 1990. the same claim remains pending. i have waited 1600 days fda delays and denials. the va erroneously denied my claim seven times. for nearly 12 years, my claims that title at va because va did not respond to the notice of disagreement. the court of appeals for veterans claims returned my claim to the va three times based on errors, errors conceded by the va. i know va is waiting for me to die. without immediate attention my claim is destined to sit, idle for several more years as a way, hope and pray for resolution. my late husband, ronnie, was born in memphis, tennessee. on december 31, 1947. as a 19-year-old college student, he was drafted into the u.s. army. ronnie was deployed to the vietnam war in
who asked you environmental law far long time. please, do what you can to work with the administration. so we don't have overlapping of potentially inconsistent regulations. very frustrating for the public. we want it to be done responsibly and in a way people can understand. thank you for being here. thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you, mr. peters. >> the gentle mab from arizona. >> thank you. i only had two things i wanted to walk through. everyone in the committee with us here yesterday. i'm sorry, you're going hear the same stheem again. the large data bases that are used particularly in things like pm10 which is a big deal in the desert, southwest we have the thing called dirt. without grass on it. so it really does affect our lives. down to the individual -- because you and i know with all other type of data. you are a social an throw polks when you were being vetted and doing your review of data. you got down to the line item. if there was something personal you do a nonidentifier number. you strip the personal data and put them up on websites where it's a egalitarian. if a c
is no stranger to historic moments. he started his law career at the clerk supreme court justice harry blackmun during the 1972 term on blackmun wrote the landmark roe v. wade decision. nearly 30 years later, president george w. bush appointed him commissioner of the ins. that was weeks before the attacks of september 11. he served as assistant secretary of the interior in the reagan edmonds ration ms urge annan said the united states senate. he was president and ceo of cross maps technology and is currently a senior fellow at the migration policy institute birth border control and security initiatives. as a board member of human rights first, we've been incredibly blessed with his with an expertise of which have been invaluable to us in navigating complex political challenges. please join me in welcoming board member, jim ziglar. [applause] >> thank you, lease for that very kind and generous introduction. excuse me. it is a particular pleasure and honor for me today to introduce the keynote speaker. senator patrick leahy from the great state of vermont. if a particular pleasure because i consi
bills, but trying to defund the health care law would be more productive. host: thank you for joining us this morning. guest: thank you for having me. >> on update on the defense bill. then the house meets at 5:00. on the agenda, requiring a study of state child abuse penalties. >> i got upset with the they coveredause my mental health work the first few meetings i had, and then they never showed up anymore, and one day i was walking in the downstairs floor in the white house and met this woman who was one of the press people. nobody ever covers my meeting. she said, is not just a sexy issue. we toured the country, found out what was needed, developed legislation, and past the mental health assistance act of 1980 -- healththe mental assistance act of 1980, and it passed to congress. one of the greatest disappointments of my life, it was never implemented. first lady rosalynn carter tonight at 9:00 eastern, also on c-span radio and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff is pressing congress to act this year on defense policy bill. dempsey wrotee -- to house and senate l
will focus on an important intersection between dna and the law and that is in forensic genetics, forensic applications and i will illustrate some of the points with case studies in which dna has been used in forensic context. so our body is a marvelous collection of about 100 chilean cells and inside almost all of these cells is the nucleus of the cell here, we can find dna. the dna is organized along chromosomes. we can can observe these under microscope and if we look very closely at these chromosomes, received this double helix structure, the classic structure of the dna molecule. along the dna are these cases, a, c, t and g's that compose jeans. we humans have 21,000 genes. each gene encodes an important component of our body, an important protein or enzyme. so we can think of the dna is sequenced as the body's instruction manual. it's the shop annual or the human body. i will show you a little bit of sequence here. you can't read this. this is about 3000 dna bases, a very tiny proportion of our total dna sequence. in fact each of ourselves has about 3 billion dna base pairs. so what
and current law. the pell will be exposed to sequestration this includes the vantage point of your community college. >> that really is a good. >> 7% reduction, certainly is going to hurt them and it will still pay for all other classes and it will reduce the amount that they have for books and those are getting a little bit and byte on the cost of this and the students will certainly increase the borrowing that they are going to do in order to make up for the shortfall. >> exacerbates this policy of pushing these student loans and this is the best case scenario. and the other issue with budget funding is that it pushes up against deadlines were students and parents don't have a sure picture of how much they are getting when they are trying to make these college going decisions. >> i think it's important that we absolutely focus on the future. up to a 7% reduction as a result of sequestration, over a two-year period of time. is that correct? >> yes, that is correct. >> another issue that this committee has looked at is an idea that seems to have had great currency. on capitol hill. and this
-span. treasury secretary jacob lew gave update on the dodd-frank regulation law. speaking at an event hosted by the pew charitable trust, secretary said the obama administration would press for more comprehensive global financial regulation in up coming g20 summit in australia. >> good morning everyone and thank you so much for joining us for this very special event. little housekeeping before i get started. please once secretary lew finish his remarks, stay seated. @&c"pe hosting this 76th secretary of the united states treasury jack lew. it has become a major influential voice on many of the toughest issues confronting society today. throughout 65 year history, pew has remain faithful to the guiding principle. tell the truth, and trust the people. be it healthcare, be it environment, economic mobility, pew has spoken truth to power to improve the lives of millions of people throughout the world. of course almost two years ago, pew along with the c.f.a. institute cofounded the council. which sought to give voice to the people's interest. i'm particularly pleased secretary lew will be speaki
decision made by a private company and dcms everybody by law to say that from anything in the payment arrangements between private health insurance plans and health care provided. but i do see them as we use the authority it has to which are adequate provided networks are this all medicare advantage plans 12 ensure beneficiaries havofaccess to health care serv. so let me ask you, since they are no longer part of the specific medicare advantage network, what suggestions would you offer them. my understanding is more than 90% of physicians in america are willing to accept new patients under the traditional medicare program. so it's moving to traditional medicare an option for them right now? >> moving back to the original medicare is an option right now are moving to another medicare advantage plan. it's orange than most of those positions and most of the hospitals or other providers that have been dropped from united or other managed care networks are in of the medicare advantage networks or are in as you said in the original medicare program. so this happens every year to some extent,
that they have gotten a starbucks latte, but that doesn't necessarily help them improve upon the law of big numbers or big averages where you ultimately finish with a mediocre result. how do we change an entire generation of twentysomethings? how do you get that to something you were talking about? how do you get that 21-year-old to learn how to apply this? make it applicable? >> going back to the concept, likefolio was created to spark that interest. it is not enough. they have to learn about the fundamentals. they have to learn about risk management. more and more companies like td ameritrade are taking all of the education and insights that they need to know and delivering it free of charge. >> is that like the casino? >> i do not think so. in terms of the sustainability of my business, i will continue to have a job. education is a key component of that. the more successful our clients are, the more successful our businesses will be. >> next question. the amount of options and derivatives in td ameritrade at the time was about 9% of volume. it is now in the mid-40's. that is incredible g
director of the law project since january 2, 2008. she has worked at the afl-cio, she is focused on minimum wage, living wage, pay equity for women. many issues we are pursuing around this country through our membership. we want to introduce each of the witnesses first or do we want to have them testify one at a time? >> we would ask you to make your statement brief so we can get to all the witnesses. >> we really appreciate the committee holding this important hearing today on what is an urgent matter for millions of americans. who will lose their unemployment benefits over the holidays. more than 3 million by the first of july if congress fails to act to remove the emergency unemployment program. a written statement is in the record and i will keep my statements brief. i want to emphasize that although the economy has improved, it is far from a healthy economy that provides job opportunities for all who need and want to work, particularly the long-term unemployed. unemployment remains higher than it was before the recession and it has kicked down a little bit since the last time the progr
. it will treat everyone equally under the law, it will help parents control their children's future and their education, it will help creators have more jobs for workers. it will treat you the same way everyone else, the matter the color of your skin, what part of town you comfort. we have tried the bailouts, excessive taxation. it has not worked. it does not work. we will try a new approach. you can meet your new challenges as you rebuild your cities, it will endure and prevail. i promise you that i will work you do we do that. thank you very much. [applause] >> it is my job to sort hundreds of questions and tried to get them into some kind of order. i will start locally with a student question. what made you take interest in detroit's issues? >> they are in the news. i think about it from two different perspectives. i will be honest with you. i am about politician, i'm a republican, i want votes. our party needs or votes and they are not getting more out of detroit. i am a physician and i want to diagnose problems and come up with solutions. in the past, a lot of times republicans
questions about the thethcare law and unemployment numbers released earlier today. over an hour.le >> i'm four minutes late. that. to apologize for >> you are 45 minutes early. >> you know, even in middle age you can turn over a new leaf. i know that it is infrequent that we are this close to on time and i want to say i owe you a standing apology on that. we are just having fun here. with that, i will wish you all a happy friday even though it is raining. and say that i have a topper. today, as part of the daily messaging effort to highlight specific benefits of the health care law that are already making a big difference, the white house and supporters of reform are focused on how growth and health care costs are at historically low levels along multiple dimensions. according to the most recent projections, health care spending grew at the slowest rate on record over the last three years. real per-person spending grew at a 1.3% rate. this was seen in medicare, medicaid, and private insurance. health care price inflation is at its lowest level in 50 years. healthcare law is currenting t
backgrounds, the best law schools in america they went to. they all have good work records. but they have objected to them. so, you know, madam president, my friend, who i have great admiration for, the senior senator from the state of tennessee, he has a stellar record, a governor of the state, a cabinet secretary, and he's been a very fine senator. but in his heart he knows what's going on here in the senate has been wrong. and he may criticize the majority leader for working to change the rules here, but, madam president, they've been changed before, they're going to be changed again. it simply is not working and who can complain about majority vote? who can complain about that? someone talks about this filibuster as if it's something that's engraifn someplace along -- graven someplace along with the ten commandments. but it's not in the constitution, it's something we've developed in the senate for rules. it helped to get legislation passed but my friend, the republicans the last number of years have used it to defeat legislation. so these nominations should have been approved, we sho
in particular. of -- that's why the president signed into law the small business jobs act of 2010. there are a whole range of components of the program that, you know, sba has implemented, that the u, da has implemented -- usda has impresented. at treasury we have three different pieces of that legislation. one was a small business lending fund. this was a program that invested $4 billion in community banks. these are the banks that do the lion's share or an outsized portion of the share of the lending to small and microbusinesses. because of that $4 billion investment in 332 institutions across the country, community banks and cdfi loan funds or community development loan funds, we are seeing positive returns for the taxpayer. so this is at no cost to the taxpayer, and we're also seeing that lending has increased by more than $10 billion. so you take that $4 billion investment, as a result the institutions have invested -- have loaned more than $10 million above and beyond the lending that they were doing beforehand. but that actually turns into around 41,000 new loans to small b
and options within the law. i understand that the restaurant industry has a unique makeup. what proposal does the coalition have to provide flexibility while upholding the law's goal of expanding insurance coverage i don't -- where do you see that? >> okay. i was referencing the regulation. >> i'm not familiar with about three i'm not familiar enough to speak to that. what i would like to speak to is you mentioned social security, to my generation and every generation behind us, what social security is known for his being a completely unsustainable program. i would also like to mention that we -- you and i got started with a 24 hour diner and had about ten or 12 employee and we spent all night turning it into a real business and there was nothing more we wanted them to build our business and added to it and i've been fortunate to have good advice from people over the years that have done similar things and what they have shared with me time and time again that turned out to be true in our case is every next step you take it harder than the step behind you and there is significant growth that
washington, go back to grand rapids, practice law, had no money, make a little bit of money for the kids and so on, and intervening events played havoc with that, but they left washington to go to another destination. >> host: we talked about the struggles with alcohol when he was in the house of representatives. here's what she wrote about this in the white house years. the next problem got worse and my pills were always with me. still, i didn't not drink alcoholically in the white house. there was too much at stake. what little drinking we did was confined to camp david on a weekend or drinks upstairs before we went to bed. now she said the pills were always with me. how big a problem was this for her in her white house years? >> guest: you know, i don't know how to answer that. she's a circumstantial alcoholic, if there is such a thing, and as far as the pills are concerned, you mentioned 33 state dinners. she was in all of them, a vital host, and so i'm not sure that the problem really erupted when they left washington. i mean, it was a significant problem before the presidency, and
as ours, or our other allies in the developed world. so there is a thinking amongst intelligence and law enforcement circles that it's harder to perpetrate a plan, a lone wolf terrorist plot come in a place like india or any other country in south asia than there is in the developed world. there is an opportunity to study what's going on in terms of the lack of lone wolf terrorist attacks in other developing societies. the real possibility is we've seen time in and time out of terrorist attacks here. lastly i just want to be, i'm going to talk about radicalization. i want all of us to look at the carefully, what does radicalization into. what does al qaeda can we say bin laden is gone, al qaeda is the essentially damaged, we are kind of a little bit obsessed with the organization of al qaeda. the organizational structure of al qaeda. there is the ideology of course which we have been able to do much about. deradicalization imprisons and narrative for example, are important strategies to employ. then there are the outside movements which are still intact. if you like it the ideology -- lo
of stories i hear when talking to americans, who every day remind us that we enact this law in the first place not only to offer good health insurance for america, but to -- it is about not only health care, it is about the good health of all americans. we have had a busy day so far. that is why we are coming in now. democrats held a hearing on the impending expiration of a lifeline that many americans depend on, unemployment insurance. the ranking member of the ways and means committee has been championing this issue every day for a very long time. we had witnesses that spoke passionately to the shared stories of the 1.3 million americans who will be cutoff from federal unemployment compensation right in the middle of the holidays. of thousands of americans who rely on these benefits will lose them. up to 2 million children can be impacted by the loss of these benefits. 1.9 million more americans will lose their benefits in the first half of next year. it is essential that we extend benefits. unemployment benefits remain one of the best ways to grow the economy in a very immediate way.
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